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FIELD TRIPS

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Icon_01 Instructor pointing out crystals in rock veins. Geology field trips give students plenty of opportunities to collect rocks and minerals on field trips. Icon_02Students observing wave patterns from a Palos Verdes cliff.
Icon_03 Landslides are common in Southern California and are evidenced by scarps at the top and hummocky (bumpy) landscape below. Icon_04 Geology students having a picnic on rock layers.
Icon_05 Oceanography class on field trip to tide pools along Palos Verdes. Icon_06 Oceanography Students discussing salinity and temperature changes in tide pools.
Icon_07 Geology student discovers a rock so interesting that she will keep it. Icon_09 Pebble and boulder beach created by ocean waves concentrated on thsi Palos Verdes headland.
Icon_10 Looking for different types of cliff erotion. Hard rocks such as sandstone and basalt create cliffs whereas shale erodes into slopes. Icon_11 View of a marine terrace in Palos Verdes, created by wave reosion and fault uplift of rock.
Icon_13 Hard rock, such as basalt, resists wave erosion creating a headland and sea stacks. Icon_14 Examining a fault detectable by the rocks on opposite sides of the fault.
Icon_17 Great views and spectacular rocks can be seen on Geology field trips. trip1 Geology 30A student in front of Artists Pallette, Death Valley. The bight colorsare volcanic ash layers that are weathered by hot water.
trip2 Having a picnic on top of cincer cone volcano in Death Valley. This volcano is split in two by a fault. trip3 Badwater, the deepest point in North America, can be visited on the Geology 30A Death Valley trip in the Fall semester.
trip4 Seeing Ubehebe volcani in Death Valley at sunset. falls Students at an ancient fosilized waterfall.
redrock Students at impressive Red Rocks formation. breccia Geology class gets a group photo taken against a spectacular wall of limestone breccia formed near a fault in Titus Canyon in Death Valley.
rocky path Great overlook of faults, horst (right), and graben (left). What a view of nature's beauty. slides Geology students letting loose in Mozaic Canyon by sliding down a smooth marble dry waterfall. Who needs water?!
geosalt Geology student really getting down to earth by licking a block of salt on a desert playa. spheres Beautiful examples of spheroidal weathering, where the granite rock is eroded into round spheres by uneven weathering of the rock along joints. This is a distinctive feature of granite that is so common in California.
ubehebe Students walking along the edge of a volcano, which is known by its Indian name, Ubehebe. Icon_02 Students observing wave patterns from a Palos Verdes Cliff.
Icon_05 Oceanography class on field trip to tide pools on the coast. Icon_06 Oceanography Students discussing salinity and temperature changes in tide pools.
Icon_09 Pebble and boulder beach created by ocean waves concentrated on this Palos Verdes headland. Icon_13 Hard rock resists wave erosion creating a headland and sea stacks.
Icon_11 View of a marine terrace in Palos Verdes, created by wave erosion and fault uplift of rock. beach Oceanography students enjoying a trip to the beach to examine the different beach processes such as longshore drift and berm creation.
bottles Students sampling the seawater in Nansen bottles for later analysis on board the reasearch vessel. cruise Students enjoying the oceanographic cruise aboard the RV Vantuna available to all oceanography students.
dredge Retrieving rock samples from the seafloor by using a rock dredge that is dragged behing the ship. coast California Geography field trip to Big Sur Coast.
mission Carmel Mission. aquarium Kelp Forest, Monterrey Bay Aquarium.
pinnacles Pinnacles National Monument. vineyard Ebele Winery, Paso Robles.
Last Published 12/21/16