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Speaker Biographies

Ludivina García Arias

Ludivina García Arias (Morella, México) is a Mexican-Spanish politician, daughter of Spanish exiles. Mrs García Arias got a BA at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México on World History. She moved back to Spain shortly before the end of the dictatorship, and joined the PSOE (Partido Socialista Obrero Español) which was a clandestine organization. During the Transition, between 1979 and 1986, she was elected member of Congress representing Asturias. In 1986 she became a Euro-deputy as a member of the European Parliament in Brussels, a position she held until 2000. Between 1987 and 2000 she was the President of the Association of the Descendants of the Spanish Exiles. She is now retired and lives in Spain.

 

Dr. Alan Chan

Dr. Alan Chan is the winner of the first ASCAP "George Duke" Commissioning Prize in 2015, to create a new piece for the 67-piece Symphonic Jazz Orchestra, which will be premiered in May 2017. He often takes inspiration from his cross-cultural experience as a resident of the United States, Hong Kong and Europe, and from visual arts and poetry. He founded the 17-piece Alan Chan Jazz Orchestra in 2011 and their “Shrimp Tale” debut album received raved reviews from the U.S. and abroad. He is currently the Director of the Concert Jazz Band and Applied Jazz Program, and teaches Survey of Jazz (Mus 113), a fun class that opens your ears to the world of jazz, available in both fall and spring semesters.

 

Alicia Class

 Alicia Class   Alicia Class is a native of Southern California.  She has been at El Camino as a full-time instructor since 1998.  She majored in French, International Relations, Teaching English as a Second Language (TESOL), and Spanish, and received her degrees, B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. from USC.  Her interests include cross-cultural and gender studies.  She enjoys traveling, learning foreign languages (has studied Arabic, German, and Greek), singing and swimming.

 

Ramón Duarte

Ramón Duarte (Oviedo, Spain) first started studying the military fortifications as a student of photography  at the Art School in his hometown. He would later cofound ARAMA36/37 (Asociación para la Recuperación de la Arquitectura Militar Asturiana 36/36), an association that was created to investigate and preserve these structures. He was the vice president of the association, and he has organized talks, and guided tours  for schools and other organizations.  He was the organizer and coordinator of the exhibition "The Charts of 1937" sponsored by the Military Archive in Ávila (Spain) and the Ministry of Culture of the Asturian Government. He has organized many conferences, and has participated as a guest lecturer at different courses organized by the University of Oviedo.  Ramón Duarte  earned a BA in Geography, and an MA  on "Land Resources and Territorial Ordinance". He is currently working on his Ph. D. on the military fortifications.

 

Adam Hochschild

Adam Hochschild is a journalism professor at UC Berkeley, California. Adam Hochschild is the author of eight books; the latest, "Spain in Our Hearts: Americans and the Spanish Civil War, 1936-1939," appeared in 2016. "Bury the Chains: Prophets and Rebels in the Fight to Free an Empire's Slaves" won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, the PEN USA Literary Award, the Gold Medal of the California Book Awards, and was a finalist for the National Book Award. He has twice been a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. His "Finding the Trapdoor: Essays, Portraits, Travels," collects some of the articles he has done in several decades of writing for various newspapers and magazines. Earlier in his career, he was a reporter for the San Francisco Chronicle, a commentator on National Public Radio's "All Things Considered," and an editor and writer at Mother Jones magazine. His articles have also been published in the New Yorker, Harper's, the Atlantic, the New York Times Magazine, and elsewhere. In 2009 he received the Theodore Roosevelt-Woodrow Wilson Award from the American Historical Association and in 2014 he was elected a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

 

Jon Minei

 Jon Minei   Professor Jon Minei began his performing career at age 19, premiering at the Mirabelle Palace in Salzberg, Austria and also at Mozart's Residence in Vienna. In addition to classical guitar, he has performed with a variety of musical theater companies; performing as a pit musician for Man of La Mancha at the renowned 2001 Tony Award Winning Utah Shakespearean Festival in Cedar City, Utah. David Nichols of the Los Angeles Times calls his playing "Superb!" The late Poly Warfield of Backstage West describes his playing as "...plangent strains of enchantment ..."

As a soloist and ensemble player, Jon has performed extensively locally and abroad. His principle instrument is a 7-string classical guitar with extended lower and upper registers, made by Michael Thames of Taos, New Mexico.

He began his formal studies at El Camino College with John Dearman of the Grammy Award winning Los Angeles Guitar Quartet and completed his Bachelors in Music at the University of California, Irvine with early music specialist, John Schneiderman. He then went on to complete his Masters in Music at the Thornton School of Music at the University of Southern California studying with classical guitarists William Kanengiser and artist-in-residence, maestro Pepe Romero. 

Jon Minei is the Director of Guitar Studies program as an associate professor at El Camino College in Torrance, CA. Jon is currently a doctoral candidate at the University of Southern California pursuing a DMA in classical guitar, having studied with Scott Tennant, Adam Del Monte, and Brian Head, minoring in Studio/Jazz Guitar (instructor, Pat Kelly), Music Industry, and Music Education. He has also completed coursework in the Arts Leadership & Entrepreneurship program under former chair of the National Endowment of the Arts, Dana Gioia. 

Professor Jon Minei began his performing career at age 19, premiering at the Mirabelle Palace in Salzberg, Austria and also at Mozart's Residence in Vienna. In addition to classical guitar, he has performed with a variety of musical theater companies; performing as a pit musician for Man of La Mancha at the renowned 2001 Tony Award Winning Utah Shakespearean Festival in Cedar City, Utah. David Nichols of the Los Angeles Times calls his playing "Superb!" The late Poly Warfield of Backstage West describes his playing as "...plangent strains of enchantment ..."

As a soloist and ensemble player, Jon has performed extensively locally and abroad. His principle instrument is a 7-string classical guitar with extended lower and upper registers, made by Michael Thames of Taos, New Mexico.

He began his formal studies at El Camino College with John Dearman of the Grammy Award winning Los Angeles Guitar Quartet and completed his Bachelors in Music at the University of California, Irvine with early music specialist, John Schneiderman. He then went on to complete his Masters in Music at the Thornton School of Music at the University of Southern California studying with classical guitarists William Kanengiser and artist-in-residence, maestro Pepe Romero. 

Jon Minei is the Director of Guitar Studies program as an associate professor at El Camino College in Torrance, CA. Jon is currently a doctoral candidate at the University of Southern California pursuing a DMA in classical guitar, having studied with Scott Tennant, Adam Del Monte, and Brian Head, minoring in Studio/Jazz Guitar (instructor, Pat Kelly), Music Industry, and Music Education. He has also completed coursework in the Arts Leadership & Entrepreneurship program under former chair of the National Endowment of the Arts, Dana Gioia. 

 

Andrés Moina

Andrés Moina (Éibar, Guipúzcoa, Spain) has been a Spanish assistant professor for El Camino College since 2013. He got his licenciatura in English Philology from the University of Deusto (Bilbao, Spain) and came to the U.S. as a graduate student, receiving his M.A. in Linguistics from West Virginia University. He is a bilingual speaker of Basque and Spanish who has worked as a translator and as an instructor for several institutions both in Spain and the US.

 

Dr. Brian Morris

Dr. Brian Morris is an emeritus professor at UCLA. Professor Morris´s main research interests are in twentieth-century Spanish literature, especially of the period 1920-1936.  He has paid particular attention to the works of Rafael Alberti and Federico García Lorca, to the influence of the cinema on Spanish writers, and to the impact of Surrealism on writers of mainland Spain and the Canary Islands.  In Tenerife he has concentrated on Domingo López Torres, whose complete works he has edited (in collaboration), and on Pedro García Cabrera, on whom he has written two books in recent years. He earned a BA and an MA  at the University of Manchester, and a Litt. Degree at the University of Hull (UK).

 

Dr. Julie Prieto

Dr. Julie Prieto is a Presidential  Management Fellow at the US Army Center of Military History. She earned her BAs at UCLA in both History and Sociology, and a PhD at Stanford University in U.S. History. She was a lecturer at University of Maryland Baltimore County, and she is currently a historian at the US Army Center of Military History in Washington D.C. Dr Prieto was the recipient of the ALBA George Watt prize Award in 2007 for her work "Partisanship in Balance: The New York Times Coverage of the Spanish Civil War, 1936-1939."

 

Dr. Francis B. Rang

Dr. Francis B. Rang taught at El Camino between 1984 and 2015, when he retired.  He has taught elementary school, middle school, high school as well as at USC, Immaculate Heart College and El Camino. He earned his AB at The Creighton University in Omaha, Nebraska; and his MA and Ph.D at USC in Los Angeles  He visited Spain and Turkey during his sabbatical leave in 2004 studying the Spanish of the Sephardic Jews as it is still spoken in Istanbul.

 

Dr. Silvia Ribelles de la Vega

Dr. Silvia Ribelles de la Vega (Oviedo, Spain) has taught at El Camino since 2008. Before that she was EFL teacher for University Extension at Universidad de Oviedo (Spain), high school teacher in Madrid (Spain), and Elementary school for the Bilingual and Immersion programs in Compton, California. She earned a BA and a Masters Degree in English from the University of Oviedo (Spain), and a PhD from the University of Extremadura (Spain). She has published three books, including one novel, and several research articles. She  has also translated two works by professor David W. Pike into Spanish.

 

Aitana Vargas

 Aitana Vargas  

Aitana Vargas (Madrid, Spain) is a foreign correspondent. She first came to the US on a tennis scholarship. In the early 2000s, she studied Physics while anchoring a local TV show in Georgia (US). She then pursued a Master in Broadcast Journalism at Staffordshire University (UK), and years later, she obtained a Master in Political Journalism at Columbia University in New York, where she worked along Prof. Rashid Khalidi and Prof. Thomas Edsall on her thesis about the Palestinian-Israeli conflict. In 2014, Vargas claimed first place at the 56th SoCal Journalism Awards hosted by the LA Press Club for a two-part exposé describing unfair work conditions for hundreds of workers in the entertainment industry. That year she also won the Ana María Aguero Melnyczuk Journalism Award and was nominated for the Livingston Awards, among others. In 2015 and 2016, she obtained first place for best sports news story and best hard news story at an event hosted by the LA Press Club. Her work has appeared in The Los Angeles Times, Narratively, Hoy Los Ángeles, CNN Expansión, Univision, and she currently works as a tennis commentator for DirecTV Sports. 

Last Published 10/19/16